Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
SFGTV 150
SFGTV2 7
LANGUAGE
English 157
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> thank you. and i'm glad to see the fliers that you've -- i guess the samples you have given us. just in looking at the samples, and i know you're just developing your materials i notice that it does repeat a lot that the energy provided by cleanpower sf will be 100% renewable and clean. i think it might be useful when explaining that to mention that -- what the benefit of that is. that the power isn't going to come from power plants that create soot and cause childrens' asthma, and the reasons that many people in the community have for not wanting power plants in their community whether it's in san francisco or across the bay in another community as we saw with the trandzs bay cable. this enables people not to get the power from the power plants and enables the power plants not so much demand for them. i think it might be obviously not in such a complicated long way, but just to point out it's not just that it's clean and from solar and wind and that it's not from soot creating power plants. >> that's a point well taken to make sure we don't lose the opportunity to educate about
representative residentr lives. philip came to the u.s. from hong kong when he was a teenager. he attended george washington high school and worked as a youth counselor for the mayor's office summer youth program. he was a vista volunteer with the california youth authority before joining the san francisco housing authority?hp$k in '78. he holds a banc bachelor's degre from san francisco state university. he's a member of board of directors for self-help of the elderly. pamela, earned a injuries doctor and a public law certificate from the university of san francisco school of law and became a member of the state bar of california in 2010. she chaired the student bar association diversity committee, nationally recognized with the american bar association henry j. ramsey jr. award towards advancement of diverse individuals. pamela also earned a bachelor of arts at the university of california at davis. leland reuben was born and raised in san francisco, where he first developed a strong passion for working with l÷pápñ community. he currently oversees the intensative job readiness and works with
, opportunity and resources with the goal of helping representative residentr lives. philip came to the u.s. from hong kong when he was a teenager. he attended george washington high school and worked as a youth counselor for the mayor's office summer youth program. he was a vista volunteer with the california youth authority before joining the san francisco housing authority?hp$k in '78. he holds a banc bachelor's degre from san francisco state university. he's a member of board of directors for self-help of the elderly. pamela, earned a injuries doctor and a public law certificate from the university of san francisco school of law and became a member of the state bar of california in 2010. she chaired the student bar association diversity committee, nationally recognized with the american bar association henry j. ramsey jr. award towards advancement of diverse individuals. pamela also earned a bachelor of arts at the university of california at davis. leland reuben was born and raised in san francisco, where he first developed a strong passion for working with l÷pápñ community. he curr
with the goal of helping representative residentr lives. philip came to the u.s. from hong kong when he was a teenager. he attended george washington high school and worked as a youth counselor for the mayor's office summer youth program. he was a vista volunteer with the california youth authority before joining the san francisco housing authority?hp$k in '78. he holds a banc bachelor's degre from san francisco state university. he's a member of board of directors for self-help of the elderly. pamela, earned a injuries doctor and a public law certificate from the university of san francisco school of law and became a member of the state bar of california in 2010. she chaired the student bar association diversity committee, nationally recognized with the american bar association henry j. ramsey jr. award towards advancement of diverse individuals. pamela also earned a bachelor of arts at the university of california at davis. leland reuben was born and raised in san francisco, where he first developed a strong passion for working with l÷pápñ community. he currently oversees the inten
it for me? >> sure. basically he is saying that the terminology used in the original report is fine. i used language that what would be the traditional academic version of the language and he is okay. he doesn't feel there is a reason to make change scption he understands it's it was done accordingly and reasons why i changed the language is primarily it was the language used in the city and since was to deal with san francisco and the discussion going on at the time i wanted to keeplet language the same to that discussion and why i had the definitions the way it was and he wanted changes made that were more traditional in nature. >> are you a academic or a card carrying member of a amdemmic institution? >> no. >> thank you. >> before we take any action is there any member of the public that would like to speak on this item? seeing none public comment is closed. mr. fried in terms of here, the lafco we can make the changes? >> yes, you can or if you don't want to. >> it's up to the commission. commissioner avalos. >> i don't feel strongly about makes changes. the report was complete
meeting, can you give us a little more information what that will look like so that we have a better sense of what it is that we're going to try to accomplish? >> barbara hale, assistant general manager for power. what i am proposing and ms. miller and i have not yet had an opportunity to discuss this more fully. i understand the commission secretaries have talked and it's a to do on our list just to talk further. what we would like to propose is to address the time line for providing service, and to give you a flavor of some of the key steps, key activities that have to occur for us to be able to go forward, and to discuss the scope, geographic scope and size of the program and customer base we would be proposing to offer service to in the first phase, both through preenrollment program and the opt out portion of the program so it's those two primary items we have at the puc on our list to discuss with you. miss miller, did you have anything to add or subtract? >> i thought we would talk about marketing and outreach and an item and providing a schedule and have the consultant come if th
allows us to remain on the premises until may of 2015. so the one agreement, that has us exiting, would call for an early exit by no later than february 4, 2013. in consideration for that early exit, we've negotiated a payment to cover the cost of the move itself, as well as the increased cost of occupancy because rental rates have increased since we struck the agreement at 875 stevenson. so that's sort of where we're at, and why we're leaving. the other question is where we're going. so we have, at 875 stevenson street our repromail operations, treasurer tax collector, assessor, recorder, business property division, department of public works, bureau of street use and mapping, human resources, department of public works and general services agency, as well as city attorney's office claims division. all within the footprint of 875 stevenson. the majority of those folks would move to one location, 1155 market street where we have negotiated a new lease. 1155 market street was the headquarters location of the sf puc. so you may recall they occupied both that building and the buildi
the money that has been allocated for san francisco, it's money that can be used for different things. and the fact that the mta board of directors chooses to use this increase the accessibility of public transportation for low income youth does not mean that the mta cannot, at the same time, turn around and use some of the money for maintenance. that somehow the lack of reliability of the system of an agency that has anpvpx& $800 min budget rests solely on the fact that it's going to make public transit more accessible to low income kids, it's simply not reflective of the reality that has been true of muni for the last few years. muni, to the extent that their issues about maintenance, the reason for that is not because of the funding of these types,%f programs. to the extent thatmine is failing or hasjpn,1 to address those issues, it is not because of somehowqpihb making public transportation more accessible to poor kids in this city. i think it's simply unfair to place that responsibility on that group. we all have ajr:ñ responsibilito make sure that we have a reliable sy
provided in the approval for the use for this very type of pilot, that in fact it was found the funding at the request of someone in fact commissioner tiny of marin, so that this kind of a pilot that we're talking about could be funded with this money. so the idea that was put out there, that somehow this is not what this funding was intended for, respectfully is not happened at the mtc. but the main point that i want to make is this. you know, i don't know that anyone herei0÷s=úÑ questions the importance of investing in the maintenance of muni, and improving the reliability of the system, and making sure that we have a system that works for every rider. but the notion that we have to choose between that and actually making public transit affordable to low income kids, to me, is a false choice. the two are not mutually exclusive. in fact, as mr. reiskin himself noted during the hearing, and as was noted during the presentation of the tpi funding, the money that has been allocated for san francisco, it's money that can be used for different things. and the fact that the mta board of d
in the approval for the use for this very type of pilot, that in fact it was found the funding at the request of someone in fact commissioner tiny of marin, so that this kind of a pilot that we're talking about could be funded with this money. so the idea that was put out there, that somehow this is not what this funding was intended for, respectfully is not happened at the mtc. but the main point that i want to make is this. you know, i don't know that anyone herei0÷s=úÑ questions the importance of investing in the maintenance of muni, and improving the reliability of the system, and making sure that we have a system that works for every rider. but the notion that we have to choose between that and actually making public transit affordable to low income kids, to me, is a false choice. the two are not mutually exclusive. in fact, as mr. reiskin himself noted during the hearing, and as was noted during the presentation of the tpi funding, the money that has been allocated for san francisco, it's money that can be used for different things. and the fact that the mta board of directors choose
we need someone to stand with us. we feel sorry for those people that got murdered on mission street. we want to help them also, but we need someone to stand with us. we don't want to lose another child either. >>> the homicide victim are the people of color. their loved ones, living in neighborhoods and [speaker not understood] must deal with this -- >> thank you very much. >>> [inaudible]. >> that is. thank you very much. are there any other members of the public that wish to speak in general public comment? seeing none, general public comment is closed. colleagues, it is 3:37. why don't we go now to our 3:30 special commendations. why don't we go to supervisor mar with a special commendation. >> thank you, president chiu. we have a number of poets that are with us today in the chambers. before i get to the two richmond district poets, david [speaker not understood] and poetry teacher and poet susan [speaker not understood], i wanted to first introduce our first honored guest, alejandro [speaker not understood], he's the sixth poet laureate for the city and county of san fra
experienced [speaker not understood] ♪ >>> [speaker not understood], we need someone to stand with us. we feel sorry for those people that got murdered on mission street. we want to help them also, but we need someone to stand with us. we don't want to lose another child either. >>> the homicide victim are the people of color. their loved ones, living in neighborhoods and [speaker not understood] must deal with this -- >> thank you very much. >>> [inaudible]. >> that is. thank you very much. are there any other members of the public that wish to speak in general public comment? seeing none, general public comment is closed. colleagues, it is 3:37. why don't we go now to our 3:30 special commendations. why don't we go to supervisor mar with a special commendation. >> thank you, president chiu. we have a number of poets that are with us today in the chambers. before i get to the two richmond district poets, david [speaker not understood] and poetry teacher and poet susan [speaker not understood], i wanted to first introduce our first honored guest, alejandro [speaker not understood], he's the si
understood] ♪ >>> [speaker not understood], we need someone to stand with us. we feel sorry for those people that got murdered on mission street. we want to help them also, but we need someone to stand with us. we don't want to lose another child either. >>> the homicide victim are the people of color. their loved ones, living in neighborhoods and [speaker not understood] must deal with this -- >> thank you very much. >>> [inaudible]. >> that is. thank you very much. are there any other members of the public that wish to speak in general public comment? seeing none, general public comment is closed. colleagues, it is 3:37. why don't we go now to our 3:30 special commendations. why don't we go to supervisor mar with a special commendation. >> thank you, president chiu. we have a number of poets that are with us today in the chambers. before i get to the two richmond district poets, david [speaker not understood] and poetry teacher and poet susan [speaker not understood], i wanted to first introduce our first honored guest, alejandro [speaker not understood], he's the sixth po
think the director there of outreach is lisa fizano. they have "share the air" days alerts and use the social media. they involve the directors to reach out to businesses for spare the air day and benefits and i think we can have a robust program and the wheel has been invented and we could modify it for our needs. >> okay. i want to make sure that i set the right expectations for the meeting on the 30th, the joint meeting. what we are proposing to discuss is sort of the scope and purpose of the preenrollment and opt out, what communities we're proposing to go to. once we have clarity from our policy makers on the approach we're -- sort of the audience, then we can dig into, okay, how do we best reach the audience? so we won't be doing that on the 30th with the plan. we want to make sure we have the audience right first and the detail behind that will follow and it might be constructive to spend some time on the 30th getting more ideas and examples and models from the policy makers, from the commission, the two commissions. that might be a constructive item for discussion. ma
see the fliers that you've -- i guess the samples you have given us. just in looking at the samples, and i know you're just developing your materials i notice that it does repeat a lot that the energy provided by cleanpower sf will be 100% renewable and clean. i think it might be useful when explaining that to mention that -- what the benefit of that is. that the power isn't going to come from power plants that create soot and cause childrens' asthma, and the reasons that many people in the community have for not wanting power plants in their community whether it's in san francisco or across the bay in another community as we saw with the trandzs bay cable. this enables people not to get the power from the power plants and enables the power plants not so much demand for them. i think it might be obviously not in such a complicated long way, but just to point out it's not just that it's clean and from solar and wind and that it's not from soot creating power plants. >> that's a point well taken to make sure we don't lose the opportunity to educate about the benefit
authorized us to go forward with a communications, customer notification the taft order with the winning group and we will go forward with targeting the group and what factors that we need to take to add the boards communications and the focus rolling it out, launching the program to customers with service as earliest as july 2013. we expect to be before our commission on november 13 with a proposal for how to incorporate the direction from the board into the program, and then before the yourself and our commission in a joint meeting on november 30 where we will talk again about the same concept. how to factor in the direction we receive from the board into the program as we previously conceived of it. what the timing is that we envision to make sure that we're getting -- we're incorporating that direction and approaching the program at a pace that our commission and the lafco commission is comfortable with. >> thank you very much. >> thank you. >> ms. hale. ms. miller. >> yes. i believe we also have a stakeholder meeting scheduled to discuss -- this is the stakeholder meeting where
of us, yes, the community is changing, but brava has always tried to be ahead of that trend. when i came in, i tried to make it about the work that shows the eclectic mission district, as well as serving the mission. those are the types of things that i feel build one brava is >> good morning. and welcome to the san francisco county transportation authority finance committee. i am scott weiner, the chair of the committee, to my far right is commissioner elsbernd, and to my left. and to my left is commissioner carmen chu and i want to thank from sfg tv lowe, and karm anac for the video services today. matter clerk are there any announcements? >> no announcements. >> item two? >> approve the minutes of the october 16, 2012, it is an action item >> is there any public comment on item two? >> seeing none, it is closed. is there a motion to approve the minutes? >> could we take that without objection, that will be the order. item three? >> item three, recommend exercising the first one-year option of the legal services contract with nossaman llp and increasing the contract amount by $350,000,
yvonne mara and deputy city attorney jerry -- work closely with us and we commend their efforts on this as well. thank you, supervisors. supervisors, thank you. p.( #e >> president chiu: thank you to our dbi staff. why don't we go to our next commendation which will be provided by our district 5 colleague, supervisor olague!qj. >> supervisor olague: i didn't -- i have another month here so i didn't want to leave without acknowledging some of the folks that play a critical folks who live in public housing. most of these people, they work really hard, and some of them work outside of their job, donate their resources, and it's just pretty amazing, the level of commitment many of these individuals have to others. and i just wanted to make sure that members of the public also this society where sometimes it's easy to become kin cal there are still -- cynical there are people who give of themselves just out of the kindness of theirigihae heart, . and it pretty amazing. so today i'm taking the opportunity to recognize a team of people that have worked very diligently to improve the co
organizations, using community meetings. i would say that prior to our new direction from the board we had conceived of a more media centric approach and now i think it's more hand to hand engagement if you will that we really need to incorporate more into the program, and largely focused at that preenrollment part of the communication, but there is more to come on that as we develop it with bringing our contractor on board. thank you. >> commissioner schmeltzer. >> thank you. and i'm glad to see the fliers that you've -- i guess the samples you have given us. just in looking at the samples, and i know you're just developing your materials i notice that it does repeat a lot that the energy provided by cleanpower sf will be 100% renewable and clean. i think it might be useful when explaining that to mention that -- what the benefit of that is. that the power isn't going to come from power plants that create soot and cause childrens' asthma, and the reasons that many people in the community have for not wanting power plants in their community whether it's in san francisco or across the
. we went through the legal battle and you all stood with us and we're here today to break ground on this great library, big hand for all of those who put that effort in. [ applause ] this project is the 24th library that our agency has been involved in. we have renovated 16 libraries, and we have built 6 new ones. the 23rd is in the bayview in my neighborhood and that will be ready for groundbreaking in january and for completion and opening in january and now we're groundbreaking on this project. as part of this project, you will be getting a two-story library. it will be designed for led silver or greater and sustainable and as opposed to the old library it will be ready for the big one, seismically fit. something mayor lee has put forth in his leadership as mayor is that it will bring a lot of jobs and this library will be the first library to undergo the new local hiring law, meaning that 25% of san franciscans will be working on this project. big hand for mayor lee and the board of supervisors for their leadership u. [ applause ] i would like to thank our management team, ed
to us that that exit date of february 4 was firm, there was no negotiating that. once we negotiated the date we had, there was no extension possible. and there is a fiscal penalty for every day delay of our exit in this agreement. we will receive less money from shornstein for every day of delay. so if we leave on february 5, that will cost the city $10,000 in reduced revenue from that $3.25 million. it's $10,000 a day for the first week, $20,000 a day for every week thereafter. so clearly there is motivation for us to be timely in our exit. secondly, on the entry, there's only so many days between now and february 4, plus we have -- the worst time of the year to put this all together, during the holiday season. so when the construction schedule was coming together, many of these things working in parallel, we found that, because of the one week window next week, where we do not have a board meeting, that one week was absolutely critical from a standpoint of ordering furniture and other expenses that the landlord will front as is typical in a landlord-tenant agreement. the landlord
legally to use this money for the free youth pass program. this is one of the allowed uses. but as supervisor elsbernd stawtd stated so is maintenance procurement or rehabs and this is a choice, not a false choice. we heard that yesterday. we heard it today. that is absolutely rhetoric.82( and -- well i don't like it, but the fact is that transit funding is a limited thing. it's not this growing asset. you don't just use the money for something, and then it magically appears from somewhere else. it is a -- for -- i don't like it but it's a zero sum game in terms of how we use very scarce transit dollars. this is anything but a false choice. i will also say that i recall, months and months ago, hearing both the mayor and mr. reiskin state that no further operating money will be used for this program, period. those were categorical statements. so when we went to the mtc and mtc was proposing to use a form of lifeline money to give to san francisco, iñi( x.÷ think $4 million for this program, that money can't be used just for general maintenance. it is lifeline money. and i
>> thank you, president chiu. we have a number of poets that are with us today in the chambers. before i get to the two richmond district poets, david [speaker not understood] and poetry teacher and poet susan [speaker not understood], i wanted to first introduce our first honored guest, alejandro [speaker not understood], he's the sixth poet laureate for the city and county of san francisco. and can alejandro come forward? there he is. (applause) >> i wanted to first say he's a unique artist and community person. he follows in the footsteps of our first poet laureate, learn serangeti in '98, [speaker not understood] in 2000, deborah major in 2002, jack cushman in 2006, and dianne de prima in 2009. and he moved to san francisco in the early '70s from los angeles, but really has become embedded in the mission district. and i know that supervisor campos is going to make a couple of remarks in a moment. alejandro, i know, is a great teacher at san francisco state where i taught many years. his students see him as a mission visionary. he's also someone that works collectively with
have a number of poets that are with us today in the chambers. before i get to the two richmond district poets, david [speaker not understood] and poetry teacher and poet susan [speaker not understood], i wanted to first introduce our first honored guest, alejandro [speaker not understood], he's the sixth poet laureate for the city and county of san francisco. and can alejandro come forward? there he is. (applause) >> i wanted to first say he's a unique artist and community person. he follows in the footsteps of our first poet laureate, learn serangeti in '98, [speaker not understood] in 2000, deborah major in 2002, jack cushman in 2006, and dianne de prima in 2009. and he moved to san francisco in the early '70s from los angeles, but really has become embedded in the mission district. and i know that supervisor campos is going to make a couple of remarks in a moment. alejandro, i know, is a great teacher at san francisco state where i taught many years. his students see him as a mission visionary. he's also someone that works collectively with other poets. i pulled this off my
you, president chiu. we have a number of poets that are with us today in the chambers. before i get to the two richmond district poets, david [speaker not understood] and poetry teacher and poet susan [speaker not understood], i wanted to first introduce our first honored guest, alejandro [speaker not understood], he's the sixth poet laureate for the city and county of san francisco. and can alejandro come forward? there he is. (applause) >> i wanted to first say he's a unique artist and community person. he follows in the footsteps of our first poet laureate, learn serangeti in '98, [speaker not understood] in 2000, deborah major in 2002, jack cushman in 2006, and dianne de prima in 2009. and he moved to san francisco in the early '70s from los angeles, but really has become embedded in the mission district. and i know that supervisor campos is going to make a couple of remarks in a moment. alejandro, i know, is a great teacher at san francisco state where i taught many years. his students see him as a mission visionary. he's also someone that works collectively with other poets.
tenable expense stream for us, and stabilize our expenses of occupancy. so we have reduced that amount in 2009, we were down to 116,000 square feet and now we're at 81,400 square feet at 875 stevenson street. that property is right behind what's called 1355 market street, or what's been rebranded as market square, where trirt an --twitter and others have mod into. that resurgence has lit a fuse to move forward with new improvements by the ownership of both buildings, which is forcing the item before you today of an early exit from 875 stevenson. our current lease agreement allows us to remain on the premises until may of 2015. so the one agreement, that has us exiting, would call for an early exit by no later than february 4, 2013. in consideration for that early exit, we've negotiated a payment to cover the cost of the move itself, as well as the increased cost of occupancy because rental rates have increased since we struck the agreement at 875 stevenson. so that's sort of where we're at, and why we're leaving. the other question is where we're going. so we have, at 875 stevenson str
us. back in march of 2010, the board approved the three-year agreement with two-year options. we are currently in the third year, and the agreement will be expiring on june 30, 2013. back in december, 2011, you may remember, i brought before this committee, an amendment to that contract, to increase the contract by $300,000 to increase the contract to offset the cost spent and legal lawsuit related to the city of the presidio parkway project. >> in february of 2012, you may recall that i brought before the board an item to replace the $200 million dollar line of credit. athat time we were working with abdw and the rates were extremely high and we went out and came back with a new where it was yielding us a savings of $3.3 million over the court of three years. with that, we also encured $100,000 in services related to the commercial paper and this is the reason that i am bringing the item, a few months earlier than the contract expiration date. within, the services that nossman performs in addition to just the routine, and legal services related to the operations of authority, th
for joining us. we have been talking to supervisor wiener from district 8. watch for the next episode of "need your supervisor." we will be back with one of our 11 city supervisors. ♪ >> good morning. and welcome to the san francisco county transportation authority finance committee. i am scott weiner, the chair of the committee, to my far right is commissioner elsbernd, and to my left. and to my left is commissioner carmen chu and i want to thank from sfg tv lowe, and karm anac for the video services today. matter clerk are there any announcements? >> no announcements. >> item two? >> approve the minutes of the october 16, 2012, it is an action item >> is there any public comment on item two? >> seeing none, it is closed. is there a motion to approve the minutes? >> could we take that without objection, that will be the order. item three? >> item three, recommend exercising the first one-year option of the legal services contract with nossaman llp and increasing the contract amount by $350,000, to a total amount not to exceed $1,310,000, for general legal consel services and authorizing the
people that we have to thank tonight and if we are standing here, i'm pretty sure you want us to get on with the program. if we miss anyone, our apologies. again, thank you everyone who is here tonight for your support and your continuing support. >> now we're going to move on to the ribbon cutting. >> good morning. and welcome to the san francisco county transportation authority finance committee. i am scott weiner, the chair of the committee, to my far right is commissioner elsbernd, and to my left. and to my left is commissioner carmen chu and i want to thank from sfg tv lowe, and karm anac for the video services today. matter clerk are there any announcements? >> no announcements. >> item two? >> approve the minutes of the october 16, 2012, it is an action item >> is there any public comment on item two? >> seeing none, it is closed. is there a motion to approve the minutes? >> could we take that without objection, that will be the order. item three? >> item three, recommend exercising the first one-year option of the legal services contract with nossaman llp and increasing the
that is almost diminished, and that is the black color. i want to thank the mayor or listening to those of us who've met with him to share our perspective on what we should do collectively and not in isolation to make sure we will not have another press conference to bemoan, complain, wine, cry -- whine, cry about this problem of violence. some do not like to hear this true statement, but the bible says ye shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free. this community will never be free. we will never be liberated from this problem until all of our allies and our friends acknowledge that the epicenter of this problem comes from folk who look like me. i have presided over too many funerals. possibly more than any preacher in this town. persons who are not members of third baptist church. but we are gracious to let them have our facility, to accommodate them. i feel that we have something to shout about today. no stop and frisk. the mayor has said that. but the mentor of martin luther king said, "he or she who is behind in the race of life must run faster in order to catch up ." we do not ha
and squire. and nossman helping us. back in march of 2010, the board approved the three-year agreement with two-year options. we are currently in the third year, and the agreement will be expiring on june 30, 2013. back in december, 2011, you may remember, i brought before this committee, an amendment to that contract, to increase the contract by $300,000 to increase the contract to offset the cost spent and legal lawsuit related to the city of the presidio parkway project. >> in february of 2012, you may recall that i brought before the board an item to replace the $200 million dollar line of credit. athat time we were working with abdw and the rates were extremely high and we went out and came back with a new where it was yielding us a savings of $3.3 million over the court of three years. with that, we also encured $100,000 in services related to the commercial paper and this is the reason that i am bringing the item, a few months earlier than the contract expiration date. within, the services that nossman performs in addition to just the routine, and legal services related to the o
and sorted for other materials that can be othersed. -- used. what it does is create a huge blight in my neighborhood. some of the grime is left behind by some of the material that's recycled and it's an environmental issue. it's also a small business issue. it's a small business issue because there are many people who actually survive in san francisco, actually scavaging for material. and it's not people going through bins, but actually people finding trash all over the city and using that to make a living off of. so, i want to do a letter of inquiry to the [speaker not understood] to work with my office, local residents, ecology and department of public works to find out how we can create a local program to legitimatize some of the work already being done around recycling and refuse collection on our residential streets in the district. and i want to be cognizant that a lot of people are actually trying to survive in san francisco. this is one way that they're doing it. last week i also had the opportunity to meet with families who are receiving after school care in our elementary scho
, department of public works, bureau of street use and mapping, human resources, department of public works and general services agency, as well as city attorney's office claims division. all within the footprint of 875 stevenson. the majority of those folks would move to one location, 1155 market street where we have negotiated a new lease. 1155 market street was the headquarters location of the sf puc. so you may recall they occupied both that building and the building next door at 1145 market street. so there's no confusion i'll refer to 1155 as the headquarters location. that building is owned by the lors corporation although you see the agreement is with a limited liability company that is a subsidiary of lors corporation recently purchased within the last two years. we've negotiated what we think is a favorable agreement that is of a term of 10 years at 1155 market street. we do have the right to exit after five years, or after 92 months. so we have two opportunities to decide if there is a better location, or part of a greater plan to consolidate services, we have those exit opportun
coming before us to allow this building -- to go through but to cap the production of these microunits to 375 units. for that reason i will be voting to support this today. but i still wanted to reiterate the concerns that i had shared several months ago on terms of what this policy may mean. first of all i really do hope that if these units do go forward that they're tried out in other naikdz neighborhoods. soma is already experiencing incredible density and is really struggling to meet that density with infrastructure, whether it is transit and open space. and i think that it'sá ás÷ realy important that as we experiment or pilot this program, that we really study what the impact to those neighborhoods are, and are we adequately meeting those needs based on this policy. these smaller units would increase population -- could increase population in my district by as much as 32%. and i think that as we do this, it's important that we carefully study this. so i prosecute esh that we are going -- appreciate that we are going to move forward with this in this directio
that is asking us to give 2.7 million out of our state reserve fund to assist the school district. both in the recent cuts that have been made for the 21st century for their after school funding and also to assist in helping our first two classes of graduates that have to graduate a through g to graduate. as many of you have read in the press we are finding a large number of students are not on track to graduate and our first class to graduate a through g is set in the next few semesters. we have a short timeframe to do that in. we have made this commitment to grow and encourage jobs in the city. we new he had to make sure that our students that are growing up in the city are able to access those jobs because they're graduating college-ready. i want to be clear when we talk about a through g i hear the debate not all kids have to go to college and i agree but all of our kids have to graduate ready for college because you graduate ready for college you're able to access living wage jobs and if you don't have math and science classes that are required a through g you're not going to be ab
school district. this is a supplemental that is asking us to give 2.7 million out of our state reserve fund to assist the school district. both in the recent cuts that have been made for the 21st century for their after school funding and also to assist in helping our first two classes of graduates that have to graduate a through g to graduate. as many of you have read in the press we are finding a large number of students are not on track to graduate and our first class to graduate a through g is set in the next few semesters. we have a short timeframe to do that in. we have made this commitment to grow and encourage jobs in the city. we new he had to make sure that our students that are growing up in the city are able to access those jobs because they're graduating college-ready. i want to be clear when we talk about a through g i hear the debate not all kids have to go to college and i agree but all of our kids have to graduate ready for college because you graduate ready for college you're able to access living wage jobs and if you don't have math and science classes that are requi
us that the health commission was on the verge of what i hope was in this building we're going to be able to do, we from the health commission are extremely proud that our city has been able to be at the forefront on a national and world level. i congratulate everybody. i thank president obama. i thank all of our federal, state, and local officials who have continued to support the effort of the health department of our private practitioners, of all those who are here in this final effort to end the epidemic of aids. thank you very much. (applause) >> thank you. next i'm going to introduce supervisor scott weaner from district 8 who is going to -- always supported the work that we've done here. and thank you for coming. (applause) >> thank you, thank you. and i want to wish a very happy birthday to my colleague supervisor david campos. (applause) >> it seems like just yesterday that we were here and we had our hard hats on, and we were breaking the wall there when some friends of mine saw the photos, they told me i should not be wearing a hard hat. [laughter] >> it was a learni
for us to commit resources as a city is really important. and what i understand of this item is that there is a discussion about whether or not to tie the funding that's underlying this item to the rainy day fund. and to the extent that happens, to the extent that there is a connection between this appropriation and the rainy day fund, i will not support it. the rainy day fund was created for the very purpose of this city making public education a priority. the rainy day fund, as was enacted by the board of supervisors, as was crafted by then supervisor ammiano has to stand on its own terms, it has its own triggers, its own mechanisms for deciding what exactly the school district gets. and to the extent that we are trying to use this supplemental appropriation as a09( #ta way of minimizing the amount given to the school district through the rainy day fund i have a problem with that. so to the extent that this item comes back to us in the form where it is tied to the rainy day fund, i will not be supporting it, and i would encourage parents and folks in the public school commu
. and even though money is not everything, the ability for us to commit resources as a city is really important. and what i understand of this item is that there is a discussion about whether or not to tie the funding that's underlying this item to the rainy day fund. and to the extent that happens, to the extent that there is a connection between this appropriation and the rainy day fund, i will not support it. the rainy day fund was created for the very purpose of this city making public education a priority. the rainy day fund, as was enacted by the board of supervisors, as was crafted by then supervisor ammiano has to stand on its own terms, it has its own triggers, its own mechanisms for deciding what exactly the school district gets. and to the extent that we are trying to use this supplemental appropriation as a09( #ta way of minimizing the amount given to the school district through the rainy day fund i have a problem with that. so to the extent that this item comes back to us in the form where it is tied to the rainy day fund, i will not be supporting it, and i would encourag
francisco has to do better than that. and even though money is not everything, the ability for us to commit resources as a city is really important. and what i understand of this item is that there is a discussion about whether or not to tie the funding that's underlying this item to the rainy day fund. and to the extent that happens, to the extent that there is a connection between this appropriation and the rainy day fund, i will not support it. the rainy day fund was created for the very purpose of this city making public education a priority. the rainy day fund, as was enacted by the board of supervisors, as was crafted by then supervisor ammiano has to stand on its own terms, it has its own triggers, its own mechanisms for deciding what exactly the school district gets. and to the extent that we are trying to use this supplemental appropriation as a09( #ta way of minimizing the amount given to the school district through the rainy day fund i have a problem with that. so to the extent that this item comes back to us in the form where it is tied to the rainy day fund, i will not be suppo
and every inch of space is used. and we're just totally crammed in. i live in a district that is 6500 more people more dense than it was 10 years ago, and we have a number of houses that has efficiency units for the number of people who are crammed into them. and a great demand i see for housing is not something that i believe is really the kind of units that we're waiving the way here today. i do see that there are benefits for that and in certain parts of san francisco but i think over all this does not make a lot of sense to the san francisco that i know. i also know there are a lot of people who live in this city who are desperately trying to remain san franciscans representatives of this city, and are finding it difficult to be here because of the rising cost o of rent. i don't believe this is any kind of units being created that will actually be able to help that group of people. so i just cannot stomach, you know, supporting this idea, though there might be some folks who see benefit. i just will be voting against it. >> president chiu: colleagues, any further discussion? let's take
also said that you expect to see 11 of us here to at some point at roll call really follow-up roll call with a haiku at each of our weekly meetings. and i look forward to doing workshops. i know that you're encouraging all of us to really develop our artistic side as well, but i really appreciate that. you also said that you're not sure how many politicians would go for a poetry lesson, but i think you have a lot of other ideas on how the arts community can enrich kind of those of us that make political decisions in the city as well. and the last thing that i really respected was that you said that you're not deceived by the honor for you as an individual, but that you always accepted it on behalf of your community. i know you're a founder of the mission cultural center and there's a whole bunch of things i could say. but i just appreciate that you're saying this is kind of not just you, but it's also the whole mission district and the whole latino and chicano community as well. so, could you come up? and i wanted to know, supervisor campos, wanted to say anything else. -- say anything
spaces to create a much more tenable expense stream for us, and stabilize our expenses of occupancy. so we have reduced that amount in 2009, we were down to 116,000 square feet and now we're at 81,400 square feet at 875 stevenson street. that property is right behind what's called 1355 market street, or what's been rebranded as market square, where trirt an --twitter and others have mod into. that resurgence has lit a fuse to move forward with new improvements by the ownership of both buildings, which is forcing the item before you today of an early exit from 875 stevenson. our current lease agreement allows us to remain on the premises until may of 2015. so the one agreement, that has us exiting, would call for an early exit by no later than february 4, 2013. in consideration for that early exit, we've negotiated a payment to cover the cost of the move itself, as well as the increased cost of occupancy because rental rates have increased since we struck the agreement at 875 stevenson. so that's sort of where we're at, and why we're leaving. the other question is where we're going.
of us getting it right and for the residents and making change happen. it's like a tsunami of change happening and it's not going to crush us like in the past. this tide will bring us out of the darkness and i am pleased to be here and celebrate the grants for both neighborhoods and as you know i am very honored to represent. thank you director alva residence for your leadership and commitment. we are a true testament of exactly what public housing can produce. you beat the myth. you are reframe being the conversation and i thank you for your leadership. mr. mayor, thank you for allowing henry to continue to have a job. and thank you for the leadership as well and the commitment to the neighborhoods and it goes beyond public housing and hope sf gets filled and the merchants along the corridor and those that need our redevelopment. thank you very much. city administrator thank you. thank you. [applause] so both areas have unique challenges. i don't think there is any secret any that. that's why we are here and particularly excited to putting the commitment of putting our mon
at -- have a good public process and look at what the highest and best use of 14 acres of pristine lakeside land can be at lake merced. as you know the city has been in a rather difficult position with the pacific rod and gun club at lake merced. after many months, some extent years of debate with the gun club i'm pleased to bring forward a settlement that the gun club has agreed to, that will set in place a process by which the rod and gun club will largely be exiting the premises, and much more importantly, be participating in the environmental clean up that needs to be done. for decades the work -- not the work, the activity that happened at the rod and gun club caused significant environmental damage to lake merced, by some estimates over $10 million and thankfully the settlement reached by the city attorney and the puc of the rod and gun club will be participating in the cleanup cost. so i'm pleased to bring this forward, pleased we're finally bringing in i won't say conclusion to the process but beginning the final steps in ending that use out there, and finally allowing the public to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)